[ad_1]

One of the most challenging (yet convenient) workout routines for men that I’ve come across is the training that we find in the arena of military service and particularly the special requirements and operational duties placed upon members of the warrior elite, the special operations community.

There is often such a lack of information about what Navy SEALS, Marine RECON, and Army Special Forces operators do in their daily jobs and training that we wonder what exactly they’re up to. What are they physically capable of? Could I do it? Would I have what it takes to carry on after seven days without sleep, 800 calories of food, and carrying 150 pounds of gear through the extreme stimulatory environment of a war zone?

So perhaps we’re not all cut out for the physical, and more importantly, mental demands that these service members qualify themselves for. However, we can make an attempt at their physical training in an attempt to satisfy a small piece of our curiosity.

No, these are not workout routines for fitness beginners. But the beauty is that this often secretive corner of our world is open to explore (at lease with regard to their physical training) and you can try it out for yourself. You can gauge your fitness against some of the fittest men on the planet. Trust me; in a sick way, you’ll enjoy it!

This is my favorite “spec ops” workout routine that I’ve used on and off for two years. This is a modified version, meaning it’s a little more accessible for most of us than standard spec ops preparation routines.

WORKOUT OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular conditioning, weight loss, lean muscle mass

WORKOUT DURATIONS: 30-45 minutes

Day 1: Marine Corps PFT

We always begin the week with the standard Marine Corps physical fitness test, or PFT, to gauge our progress. There are plenty of calculators out there to show you what your score is and rank it against real Marines, but I just use it as a gauge.

3 mile timed run

Maximum number of abdominal crunches in 2 minutes

Maximum number of pull ups before dropping

Day 2: Swimming

800 meters of freestyle or sidestroke

If you don’t have access to a pool, substitute your choice of cardiovascular workout such as running, cycling, elliptical training, etc. This workout should be 30 minutes at a moderate pace.

Day 3: Upper Body Circuit

I typically do this workout routine in a park at a playground, but if you have access to a fitness facility, you can complete it there as well. The key here is keeping the pace up.

Warm up with a 10 minute moderately paced run

Pyramid Circuit

1 pull up, 10 push ups, 1 dip

2 pull ups, 10 push ups, 2 dips

3 pull ups, 10 push ups, 3 dips

4 pull ups, 10 push ups, 4 dips

5 pull ups, 10 push ups, 5 dips

50 abdominal crunches

5 pull ups, 10 push ups, 5 dips

4 pull ups, 10 push ups, 4 dips

3 pull ups, 10 push ups, 3 dips

2 pull ups, 10 push ups, 2 dips

1 pull up, 10 push ups, 1 dip

50 abdominal crunches

Add or subtract repetitions as your strength increases. For instance, once you can complete this circuit, add a 6th level in (6 pull ups, 10 push ups, 6 dips) and so on, then work your way back down.

Day 4: Running

½ mile warm up

¼ mile sprint

¼ mile rest

¼ mile sprint

¼ mile rest

¼ mile sprint

¼ mile rest

¼ mile sprint

¼ mile rest

½ mile cool down

Day 5: Lower Body Circuit

10 minute moderate run

Squat Jumps x 15

Lateral Hurdle Jumps x 15

Split Squat Jumps x 15

Repeat sequence 3 times

10 minute moderate run

I use this workout routine quite a bit when I travel including at resorts when I have access to a pool and want to keep the all-inclusive calories moderated. They key to this routine is that it’s highly adaptable to your current fitness level. You can alter the circuits, swimming, and running to suit you. Best of all, it’s convenient.

[ad_2]

Source by J N Johnson

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here